ARTICLE

DARPA Pushes For FAA Approval For Military Drones Over American Cities

News Image By Nicholas West/Activist Post November 05, 2018
Share this article:

Just a little over 10 years after drone surveillance inside U.S. borders was declared a conspiracy theory, it is now an indisputable fact of life. So, too, are military grade drones along the "border," which in reality constitutes a 100-mile-wide swath that encircles the continental United States and 2/3 of its population.

According to a new report from Defense One, this level of access is still seen as a restriction by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency or DARPA. As new forms of autonomous aircraft take to the skies such as the latest Blackhawk helicopter drones that could be ready by 2019, DARPA and aircraft developers want permission to fly over large cities as needed. 


Utilizing a new artificial intelligence system that is literally called MATRIX, developers see an opportunity for more flexibility in potential use. Of course, surveillance isn't mentioned among those uses:

After that, similar to Predator drone maker General Atomics, they have their eyes on FAA certification to fly large, unmanned aircraft within the continental United States, to help ferry people and supplies from the mainland to offshore oil rigs, among other potential jobs. Today, large drones likes Predators are forbidden to fly over the U.S. except in a handful of largely unpopulated areas along the U.S.Mexico border.

The FAA is now figuring out how to change guidelines to allow unmanned planes and helicopters to fly over big cities. "We are working with the FAA on that. Our stated goal is 2030. It very much depends on rule making. We are certainly hoping for sooner, for the mid-2020s, to field it," he said.

The long-range plans of converting military aircraft to drones and incorporating them anywhere and everywhere inside America is also detailed and expanded upon as a potential replacement for the already controversial use of police drones.


By 2025, enormous military-style drones - close relatives of the sort made famous by counterterrorism strikes in Afghanistan and Iraq - will be visible 2,000 feet above U.S. cities, streaming high-resolution video to police departments below. 

That is the bet that multiple defense contractors are placing, anyway, as they race to build unmanned aircraft that can pass evolving airworthiness certifications and replace police helicopters. And if that bet pays off, it will radically transform the way cities, citizens, and law enforcement interact.

We are now seeing various trends beginning to dovetail into what could become the ultimate in military presence over the United States. As I recently reported, new A.I. algorithms are being devised that look for emotional indicators in an attempt to predict crime and social unrest. 

The "Eye in the Sky" system, developed by Cambridge University, seeks to use small Parrot drones to identify "violent poses" in crowds. The system will be powered by biometric recognition and artificial intelligence.


Imagine a system like this being applied to the far more sophisticated military systems that already exist, then connecting all of it to the growing federal biometrics database.

I suspect that if the FAA does grant access to larger military aircraft over U.S. cities, it will be with the "strict guidelines" that no forms of surveillance or weaponry will be permitted onboard. Of course, once granted even the slightest access, all it will take is one catastrophic event to remove any restrictions at all.

Drones have already been developed that are equipped with camera systems like DARPA's Autonomous Real-time Ground Ubiquitous Surveillance Imaging System (ARGUS). This sensor system can instantly see an area roughly the "size of a small city" with an "all-seeing" eye according to retired Lieutenant, David A. Deptula. The next generation of surveillance tech sees the landscape through a 1.8 billion pixels camera, the highest resolution yet created.

Using a touchscreen interface that can produce up to 65 windows for analysis, military observers can see down to the individual object level to track the movements of vehicles and people. Beyond the real-time surveillance, the system can store everything for future review right down to the minutes and seconds.

Originally published at Activist Post - reposted with permission.




Other News

September 25, 2020The Biden Plan To Transform The United States Into The LGBTQ Nation

Joe Biden is the furthest thing there is from a moderate candidate. In fact, the reason he is receiving such enthusiastic endorsements fro...

September 25, 2020Wormwood Warning - Why Are So Many Asteroids Having Close Calls With Earth?

The fact that so many space rocks have been headed our way is definitely alarming even if most of them have little chance of impact, espec...

September 25, 2020Christian Employees Fired By Kroger For Not Wearing Rainbow Pins Fight Back

Kroger is being accused of violating federal law for firing two employees who refused to wear a rainbow emblem, which they believe contrad...

September 25, 2020The Inevitable Consequences Of False History

The backlash against a “1619 Project” that libels America as an irredeemably racist nation should resonate for Jews who worry about the fa...

September 23, 2020Peace Or War? Does Bible Prophecy Reveal The Next Steps In The Middle East?

Students of bible prophecy immediately take notice of any peace deal involving Israel. Why? Because the Bible says an Israeli peace treaty...

Flipping The Courts & Turning Hearts

Certainly, flipping the courts is very important. Appointing God-fearing, justice-loving judges is a great blessing to a nation. But chang...

September 23, 2020Is Saudi Arabia About To Go Nuclear With China's Help?

Saudi Arabia believes that it needs nuclearization to counter Iran. Who is to say tomorrow it won't be pointed at Israel?...

Get Breaking News