ARTICLE

New 'Woke' Denomination Is A Warning Sign To Christians

News Image By David Closson/Family Research Council December 18, 2020
Share this article:

Over the weekend, the formation of a new Methodist denomination was announced during an online worship service hosted by former and current Methodist church leaders. 

According to organizers, the Liberation Methodist Connexion (LMX), as the group will be called, is a socially progressive denomination that will reimage what it means to follow Jesus. But even a cursory review of the new denomination reveals nothing close to orthodox Christianity.

According to LMX leaders, fidelity to Scripture or Christian theology is not a priority for the new denomination. In fact, as one leader explained, "There are no doctrinal litmus tests" for joining the movement. "We seek not answers that lead to correct doctrines as to why we suffer. We seek correct actions, correct praxis, where God sustains us during the unanswerable questions," argued Rev. Althea Spencer-Miller, another LMX leader.


No doubt one of the first Methodist churches to come running to the new denomination will be Claremont United Methodist Church in California.  The theologically progressive congregation recently erected a nativity display that centered on the message of Black Lives Matter.  The display, features the Virgin Mary, Joseph, and baby Jesus in front of a wall of BLM demonstrators holding protest signs that include statements like "Let justice roll down like waters," "I Can't Breathe," "Jesus Wept," and "Say Their Names."  

In previous years the same church garnered a great deal of negative feedback when its display replaced the baby Jesus with a statue of a bleeding Trayvon Martin wearing a hoodie and in a different year used the nativity scene to promote same sex marriage.  The nativity scene featured wooden light boxes with the silhouettes of three different couples holding hands. One was a man with a woman; another was a man with a man and the other, a woman with another woman. The three couples stood under the Star of Bethlehem and a sign that read, "Christ is Born."

The creation of the new Methodist denomination is not surprising. At the beginning of the year, representatives of the United Methodist Church tentatively agreed to a proposal to split the nation's second largest Protestant denomination over "fundamental differences" regarding doctrinal differences. 

In recent years, the denomination had reached an impasse on questions related to the morality of homosexuality, same-sex marriage, and the ordination of clergy who identify as gay.

The anticipated vote to split the denomination was set to take place at the 2020 General Conference in May. However, due to the coronavirus pandemic, the vote has been delayed until fall of 2021. In terms of the details of the proposal, progressives within the United Methodist Church will give a newly formed traditionalist Methodist denomination $25 million. 

Local churches that choose to affiliate with the traditionalist denomination may retain their assets including church buildings and properties. Moreover, conservative clergy may retain their pensions. These concessions were possible because conservatives maintain a governing majority within United Methodism despite the fact that American Methodist leadership is liberal.

However, as evidenced by this weekend's developments, the extended wait time proved too long for some theologically liberal Methodists who see the new denomination as a better fit for their progressive beliefs. "The timeline of the Holy Spirit is driving our decision to launch the LMX at this moment, and we are following her call," explained Spencer-Mill, while using female pronouns to refer to God.

A cursory overview of the LMX website reveals that the denomination will resemble nothing like the movement started by John and Charles Wesley in the 18th century where the importance of the new birth, works of piety, and missions were emphasized. 

Instead, leaders of the new group promise to journey toward a "new way of being followers of Christ" which include refuting the "powers, principalities, and privileges" they believe have defined Methodism. These include a litany of isms including colonialism, sexism, clericalism, ableism, ageism, transphobia, and "heteronormativity."


While liberals within Methodism have been pushing for the inclusion of more LGBT affirming stances in recent years, the LMX represents a dramatic break from historic Methodist doctrine. But, and to their credit, the leaders of the LMX -- who proudly list their preferred pronouns on their website -- admit, "LMX theology is not written in stone." 

But while their theology isn't written in stone (or anywhere that I can find), the purpose behind the group is clear: providing ecclesiastical cover for unorthodox views on marriage and sexuality.

Even though the LMX is clearly out of the mainstream of Methodism, its emergence before the expected denominational split is noteworthy. But it is also cautionary. As Mark Tooley, President of the Institute on Religion and Democracy and Methodist leader, recently explained, United Methodism "was from the start an experiment in theological pluralism." This meant that over the years an increasingly wide range of theological views was tolerated within the denomination. 

Eventually, this meant that heterodox views could coexist with orthodoxy without causing too much of a stir. However, as the broader culture drifted further left on issues such as marriage and human sexuality, the strain between conservatives and liberals over these issues became too much. Thus, in retrospect, the splintering of Methodism over biblical interpretation was predictable. 

Without clear theological guardrails in place, there was nothing to stop those with unbiblical views from entering the denomination's ranks and no meaningful way to expel them.

Thus, while the LMX will likely remain a small group of former United Methodists and others, it stands as a cautionary tale for churches and denominations around the country. 

In an age when doctrine is not taken seriously, Christians, for the sake of faithfulness, must insist on sound doctrine and fidelity to God's Word.

Originally published at Family Research Council - reposted with permission.




Other News

January 25, 2021The Civics Trojan Horse - Schools To Become Training Ground For Woke Activism

Illinois is literally about to mandate that every one of its teachers adopt progressive political orthodoxy and impart that ideology to st...

January 25, 2021The Great Reset & The Magic Money Tree

Ben Franklin had a quote that everyone should keep in the back of their head... "When the people find that they can vote themselves money ...

January 25, 2021The Real Cost Of President Biden's Radical Transgender Activism

Of all the things that incoming President Joe Biden could do on his first day in office, why was one of them signing a radical executive o...

January 25,2021New Fears Biden Will Revive International Criminal Court Action Against Israel

The change in administration in the US has led to fears that the ICC will renew its criminal case against Israel. If successful, the case,...

January 22, 20212020 Was A Personal Financial Disaster For 55 Percent Of All Americans

Approximately 12 million U.S. renters are at least $5,850 behind in rent and utilities payments and up to 40 million people could be facin...

January 22, 2021Biden's Iran Policy Could Put It On Collision Course With Israel

As the United States enters the Biden era, Sen. Ted Cruz warns that the relationship between Washington and Jerusalem is poised to become ...

January 22, 2021New Science A Game Changer On Trans Sports

It's been one of the fiercest debates of the last year -- erupting in boxing rings, Olympic committees, even high school tracks. Should bi...

Get Breaking News